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laser microphone is a surveillance device that uses a laser beam to detect sound vibrations in a distant object.
This technology can be used to eavesdrop with minimal chance of exposure.

Nachrichten - audio Laser interception, Laser Audio Surveillance Device

The Laser Listening Device (Laser Microphone) is a highly sophisticated surveillance apparatus that utilizes an invisible infrared laser beam to eavesdrop on a target. This is the most effective long-range laser listening device in the world that allows the operator to conduct an undetectable surveillance operation on any targeted room with at least one window at an impressive distance of over 500 meters.

This laser microphone was specially developed for government and law enforcement organizations to use covertly in situations when entrance in buildings is not suitable or possible for placing a listening device into the targeted area. The Laser Listening Device is also highly undetectable as the infrared laser is completely invisible to the naked eye.

The Laser Listening Device is an easy-to-assemble and easy-to-use system consisting of three main components: laser transmitter, laser receiver, and amplifier and equalizer unit with audio recorder. It operates by transmitting an invisible infrared beam to the window of the targeted room. The Laser Listening Device detects vibrations on the window glass that are caused by sound waves (speech) inside the room and transmits them back to the receiver. The laser beam, bouncing off the target window, is then converted into electronic signals, filtered, amplified and fed into a dedicated recording unit connected to its own amplifier with speaker and headphones. Real time audio monitoring and recording are possible simultaneously.

We offer two models of this laser microphone which vary depending upon the components you require. Below are the system components for each version:

Laser Microphone Basic Version, model A79106-B-SIG

1. Micrometer platform with adjustable x/y axis (to be mounted with transmitter on Professional Manfrotto Tripod). One Professional Manfrotto Tripod with pan and tilt is included.

2. IR Receiver (RX)
Camera housing
Wire-trigger
Tele-lens 500 mm with special IR reduce cover

3. IR Transmitter (TX)
Camera housing
Wire-trigger
Telelens 135 mm
Battery pack with control panel power/search tone for transmitter (TX)

4. Tools
Amplifier and equalizer built inside the case
Cable (power supply - TX)
Set of RX/TX cordless headphones
Cable between RX and case
2 audio outputs L1/L2 for digital recorder built inside the case
Opening tool for battery slot
Antenna for cordless headphone

Laser Microphone Advanced Version, model A79106-A-SIG

1. Micrometer platform with adjustable x/y axis (to be mounted with transmitter on Professional Manfrotto Tripod). One Professional Manfrotto Tripod with pan and tilt is included.

2. IR Receiver (RX)
Camera housing
Wire-trigger
Telelens 500 mm with special IR reduce cover

3. IR Transmitter (TX)
Camera housing
Wire-trigger
Telelens 135 mm
Battery pack with control panel power/search tone for transmitter (TX)

4. Tools
Amplifier with digital noise reduction system and equalizer built inside the case
Switch between IR passive and active mode
Cable (power supply - TX)
Set of RX/TX cordless headphones
Cable between RX and case
2 audio outputs L1/L2 for digital recorder built inside the case
Opening tool for battery slot
Antenna for cordless headphone
IR stethoscope transmitter with 6V LI battery

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES

Note: Second tripod for the IR Receiver (RX) and the Digital Recorder is not included in the delivery.
Extra Standard Tripod with pan/tilt head (175 cm high), model AA79106-EST
Extra Professional Manfrotto Tripod with pan/tilt head (188 cm high), model A79106-EPT-SIG
Aluminum carry case with foam inlet for 2 Manfrottos and 2 micrometer platforms, model A79106-EAC-SIG
Extra second micrometer platform with adjustable x/y axis (mounted with receiver on tripod), model A79106-EMP-SIG
Stereo (L1 + L2) digital recorder with VOX and excellent audio quality, model A79106-SDR-SIG
Training course is available for an extra charge, model A79106-TRC-SIG

We strongly suggest our clients purchase training along with their respective system to insure that operator proficiency is maximized. Training can be arranged for an additional fee at our location or at the client’s location.

WARNING: The sale of laser microphones is restricted to Law Enforcement and Government agencies and their authorized suppliers - no exceptions. Laser microphones destined for export require an Export License from the United States Department of Commerce. Contact Argo-A Security for the required license application forms and assistance.

Laserski mikrofon - laser microphone

Laser eavesdropping is designed especially for tactical advantage. The device is easily portable and assembly takes only a few minutes.

The long-range laser audio surveillance device is a sophisticated unit designed for use in situations when a building cannot be accessed to place a room monitoring transmitter. This is the most advanced laser listening device in the world and will allow the operator to monitor conversations in a room from over 450 metres away.

The laser listening device utilises a high-powered infrared beam that, when pointed at a window, is able to detect minute vibrations in the glass created by the sound of people talking. Using these vibrations the device is able to transmit the conversation by bouncing the vibrations back through the infra-red beam to a receiver where they are filtered, amplified and fed into the device's amplifier.

The long-range laser audio surveillance device is a highly covert surveillance system due not only to the range at which it can be used but also due to the infrared laser beam being completely invisible to the naked eye. To further camouflage the device both the transmitter and the receiver are built into standard SLR cameras making the whole system look like a photographic set up and allowing for perfect concealment.

The laser audio surveillance device is a precise unit that relies on the specific alignment of the transmitter and receiver and as such is supplied with sturdy tripods for both components. Included within the price of the device is a three day training course to ensure the best results possible for any surveillance operation. The training will take place in Germany (travel and subsistance not included). The laser listening device is supplied in a robust flight case with all necessary accessories, for full specifications details please refer to the 'specifications' tab.


 

 

A laser microphone is a surveillance device that uses a laser beam to detect sound vibrations in a distant object. This technology can be used to eavesdrop with minimal chance of exposure.

The object is typically inside a room where a conversation is taking place, and can be anything that can vibrate (for example, a picture on a wall) in response to the pressure waves created by noises present in the room. The object preferably has a smooth surface. The laser beam is directed into the room through a window, reflects off the object and returns to a receiver (for example a solar panel) that converts the beam to an audio signal. The beam may also be bounced off the window itself. The minute differences in the distance traveled by the light as it reflects from the vibrating object are detected interferometrically. The interferometer converts the variations to intensity variations, and electronics are used to convert these variations to signals that can be converted back to sound.

However, countermeasures exist in the form of specialized light sensors that can detect the light from the beam. Rippled glass can be used as a defense, as it provides a poor surface for a laser microphone.

However, by simple extrapolation it should be easily possible to adapt this technique to a maser or focused microwave beam in order to fire the beam through ordinary building materials and bounce it off of internal metal objects such as heating ducts or filing cabinets. At this point the only acceptable defense is electromagnetically and acoustically isolating the interior of the structure.

 

The technique of using a light beam to remotely record sound probably originated with Léon Theremin in the Soviet Union at or before 1947, when he developed and used the Buran eavesdropping system. This worked by using a low power infrared beam (not a laser) from a distance to detect the sound vibrations in the glass windows. Lavrentiy Beria, head of the KGB, had used this Buran device to spy on the U.S., British, and French embassies in Moscow.

It has been reported that the National Security Agency makes use of laser microphones.

On 25 August 2009, U.S. patent 7,580,533 was issued for a device that uses a laser beam and smoke or vapor to detect sound vibrations in free air ("PSPYculate Flow Detection Microphone based on a laser-photocell pair with a moving stream of smoke or vapor in the laser beam's path"). Sound pressure waves cause disturbances in the smoke that in turn cause variations in the amount of laser light reaching the photo detector. A prototype of the device was demonstrated at the 127th Audio Engineering Society convention in New York City from 9 through 12 October 2009.

 

 

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